Tag: Ventilators

Some Doctors Pull Back on Using Ventilators to Treat Covid-19

It is another medical mystery of the coronavirus pandemic: Large numbers of Covid-19 patients arrive at hospitals with blood-oxygen levels so low they should be unconscious or on the verge of organ failure. Instead they are awake, talking—not struggling to breathe.

Although nobody is quite sure what about the coronavirus causes these patients to react this way, they are rapidly changing how many doctors are treating the disease. Instead of rushing to put such patients on mechanical ventilators.

 

‘It’s a horror movie.’ Nurse working on coronavirus frontline in New York claims the city is ‘murdering’ COVID-19 patients by putting them on ventilators and causing trauma to the lungs

  • A frontline nurse working in New York on coronavirus patients claims the city is killing sufferers by putting them on ventilators, advocating against them 
  • The nurse persuaded a friend, a nurse practitioner who is not working on coronavirus patients, to make the video to get the word out 
  • ‘It’s a horror movie. Not because of the disease, but the way it is being handled,’ the frontline nurse said through the friend, who only was identified as Sara NP 
  • Sara said COVID-19 patients are placed on ventilators rather than less invasive CPAP or BiPAP machines due to fears about the virus spreading
  • She explained: ‘The ventilators have high pressure, which then causes barotrauma, it causes trauma to the lungs’ 
  • More than 12,000 people have died from the virus in NYC,  with another 4,300 dying in other parts of the Empire State
  • New York emergency room doctor Cameron Kyle-Sidell stepped down this month because he didn’t want to follow the hospital’s ventilator protocol
  • Republican Minnesota Senator Scott Jensen told Fox News’ Laura Ingraham that Medicare pays hospitals three times as much if patients are placed on ventilators

 

10 Covid-busting designs: spraying drones, fever helmets and anti-virus snoods

Sesigners, engineers and programmers have heard the klaxon call. The last few weeks have seen a wave of ingenuity unleashed, with both garden-shed tinkerers and high-tech manufacturers scrambling to develop things that will combat the spread of Covid-19.

Many of their innovations raise as many questions as they answer, though. Could 3D printing now finally come into its own, with access to open-source, downloadable designs for medical parts? If so, will intellectual property infringements be waived, or will altruistic hacktivists still face costly lawsuits? Could mobile phone tracking map the spread of infection like never before, keeping people away from virus hotspots? If so, might governments use the pandemic as an excuse to ramp up surveillance measures post-crisis?